Microbiota are critical for vascular physiology: Germ-free status weakens contractility and induces sex-specific vascular remodeling in mice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

  • Jonnelle M. Edwards
  • Shaunak Roy
  • Jeremy C. Tomcho
  • Zachary J. Schreckenberger
  • Saroj Chakraborty
  • Nicole R. Bearss
  • Piu Saha
  • Cameron G. McCarthy
  • Matam Vijay-Kumar
  • Bina Joe
  • Camilla F. Wenceslau

External Institution(s)

  • University of Toledo

Details

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106633
JournalVascular Pharmacology
Volume125-126
StatusPublished - Feb 1 2020
Peer-reviewedYes

Abstract

Commensal microbiota within a holobiont contribute to the overall health of the host via mutualistic symbiosis. Disturbances in such symbiosis is prominently correlated with a variety of diseases affecting the modern society of humans including cardiovascular diseases, which are the number one contributors to human mortality. Given that a hallmark of all cardiovascular diseases is changes in vascular function, we hypothesized that depleting microbiota from a holobiont would induce vascular dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, young mice of both sexes raised in germ-free conditions were examined vascular contractility and structure. Here we observed that male and female germ-free mice presented a decrease in contraction of resistance arteries. These changes were more pronounced in germ-free males than in germ-free females mice. Furthermore, there was a distinct change in vascular remodeling between males and females germ-free mice. Resistance arteries from male germ-free mice demonstrated increased vascular stiffness, as shown by the leftward shift in the stress-strain curve and inward hypotrophic remodeling, a characteristic of chronic reduction in blood flow. On the other hand, resistance arteries from germ-free female mice were similar in the stress-strain curves to that of conventionally raised mice, but were distinctly different and showed outward hypertrophic remodeling, a characteristic seen in aging. Interestingly, we observed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from bone marrow derived neutrophils is blunted in female germ-free mice, but it is exacerbated in male germ-free mice. In conclusion, these observations indicate that commensal microbiota of a holobiont are central to maintain proper vascular function and structure homeostasis, especially in males.

    Research areas

  • Germ-free mice, Sex differences, Vascular contractility

Citation formats

APA

Edwards, J. M., Roy, S., Tomcho, J. C., Schreckenberger, Z. J., Chakraborty, S., Bearss, N. R., ... Wenceslau, C. F. (2020). Microbiota are critical for vascular physiology: Germ-free status weakens contractility and induces sex-specific vascular remodeling in mice. Vascular Pharmacology, 125-126, [106633]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vph.2019.106633

Harvard

Edwards, JM, Roy, S, Tomcho, JC, Schreckenberger, ZJ, Chakraborty, S, Bearss, NR, Saha, P, McCarthy, CG, Vijay-Kumar, M, Joe, B & Wenceslau, CF 2020, 'Microbiota are critical for vascular physiology: Germ-free status weakens contractility and induces sex-specific vascular remodeling in mice', Vascular Pharmacology, vol. 125-126, 106633. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vph.2019.106633