Vessel-specific coronary perfusion territories using a CT angiogram with a minimum cost path technique and its direct comparison to the American Heart Association 17-segment model

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Authors

External Institution(s)

  • University of California at Irvine

Details

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3334-3345
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Radiology
Volume30
Issue number6
StatusPublished - Jun 1 2020
Peer-reviewedYes

Abstract

Objectives: This study compared the accuracy of an automated, vessel-specific minimum cost path (MCP) myocardial perfusion territory assignment technique as compared with the standard American Heart Association 17-segment (AHA) model. Methods: Six swine (42 ± 9 kg) were used to evaluate the accuracy of the MCP technique and the AHA method. In each swine, a dynamic acquisition, comprised of twenty consecutive whole heart volume scans, was acquired with a computed tomography scanner, following peripheral injection of contrast material. From this acquisition, MCP and AHA perfusion territories were determined, for the left (LCA) and right (RCA) coronary arteries. Each animal underwent additional dynamic acquisitions, consisting of twenty consecutive volume scans, following direct intracoronary contrast injection into the LCA or RCA. These images were used as the reference standard (REF) LCA and RCA perfusion territories. The MCP and AHA techniques’ perfusion territories were then quantitatively compared with the REF perfusion territories. Results: The myocardial mass of MCP perfusion territories (MMCP) was related to the mass of reference standard perfusion territories (MREF) by MMCP = 0.99MREF + 0.39 g (r = 1.00; R2 = 1.00). The mass of AHA perfusion territories (MAHA) was related to MREF by MAHA = 0.81MREF + 5.03 g (r = 0.99; R2 = 0.98). Conclusion: The vessel-specific MCP myocardial perfusion territory assignment technique more accurately quantifies LCA and RCA perfusion territories as compared with the current standard AHA 17-segment model. Therefore, it can potentially provide a more comprehensive and patient-specific evaluation of coronary artery disease. Key Points: • The minimum cost path (MCP) technique accurately determines left and right coronary artery perfusion territories, as compared with the American Heart Association 17-segment (AHA) model. • The minimum cost path (MCP) technique could be applied to cardiac computed-tomography angiography images to accurately determine patient-specific left and right coronary artery perfusion territories. • The American Heart Association 17-segment (AHA) model often fails to accurately determine left and right coronary artery perfusion territories, especially in the inferior and inferoseptal walls of the left ventricular myocardium.

    Research areas

  • Cardiac imaging techniques, Cardiovascular disease, Computed tomography angiography, Coronary artery disease